General Information

There are three sizes of Schnauzer that make up the Schnauzer family, the Miniature Schnauzer, the Schnauzer and the Giant Schnauzer. All three sizes are excellent smart, stylish family dogs and have much to offer your family and lifestyle as they all have truly wonderful characters and temperament, unique to their size, which can easily adapt to their new owners.

To help you understand the Schnauzer Family and determine if you are the right person for the breed, then please click on the breed specific documents below.

The Miniature Schnauzer

ARE YOU THE RIGHT PERSON FOR A MINIATURE SCHNAUZER?mini

The Miniature Schnauzer is an excellent smart, stylish family dog and has much to offer being a small and easy to manage size as well as having a truly wonderful character and temperament which adapts to it’s owners lifestyle. His handy size makes him a popular family pet being ideally 13″ (Bitches) and 14″ (Dogs) at the shoulder. However you may come across some dogs/bitches that are a little bigger or smaller than the average. He is robust, hardy and agile, and also very alert, always warning of the approach of strangers to his property.

His sturdy frame and solid body together with a balanced outlook, makes sure that he enjoys life to the full and is game for anything. He is in no way toyish or delicate.

The breed comes in four colours with pepper and salt the most frequently seen, black, black and silver and white make him standout, and along with his non-shed coat makes him acceptable anywhere. His eyebrows and whiskers enhance his distinctive appearance. The Miniature Schnauzer usually possesses a long beard and leg furnishings and therefore you should be prepared to groom your dog on a regular basis. Even if you do intend to have your dog groomed at a grooming parlour, you should at least comb your dog’s beard and leg hair to ensure he is free from knots. Daily grooming with a wire glove on the body and a comb through the whiskers and leg hair keeps these dogs in good shape but they do require regular trimming or stripping. It is not only unfair on your dog but it is also unfair to send your dog to a groomer every six to eight weeks and expect them to cope with a ‘matted mini’.

As a show dog, the breed is smart, attractive and with that little bit extra in character that shows and commands attention. He does need particular care, attention and preparation with his coat, which can be a personal challenge at times, but the rewards and satisfaction of a job well done take a lot of beating.

In the Miniature Schnauzer you will have a loyal and loving dog that will be a friend for life.

HEREDITARY PROBLEMS

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) and Cataracts (both congenital and hereditary) occur in the Miniature Schnauzer. Every endeavor should be taken to eradicate such problems from the breed. All Miniature Schnauzers must be eye tested before mating. You should also check before purchasing a puppy that he has a clear eye test certificate. For more information please see Health Testing – Miniature Schnauzers

COMPANIONS

The Miniature Schnauzer makes an ideal family pet and will fit in with all age groups. They are excellent housedogs but can be quite vocal. If someone is around they will soon bark and let you know. The breed is also suitable for people suffering from allergic conditions. Please remember that small children should be taught that dogs are a family pet and not a toy to be continually picked up. He is equally at home in either a town or in the country, in a flat, house or bungalow with a small to medium sized, totally fenced-in garden. The lifespan of a Miniature Schnauzer is over 10 years of age.

EXERCISE

The Miniature Schnauzer will accommodate to your lifestyle and in general requires up to an hour of exercise per day but is always willing to go for any extra on offer. However, please try and be consistent, as you cannot expect a dog that has been a couch potato for long periods to suddenly go for long walks, particularly in hot temperatures. All animals can suffer heat stroke.

FOOD

Miniature Schnauzers usually have good appetites so you may have to watch their diet. Seldom will they refuse food especially the wrong sort. Be careful with tit-bits or you will become the owner of a very overweight dog.

Please remember a dog is for life and the Miniature Schnauzer is a lovely breed.

The Schnauzer

ARE YOU THE RIGHT PERSON FOR A SCHNAUZER?

standard
The Schnauzer is the middle-sized member of the Schnauzer family and is suitable for those who want something a little larger than the Miniature but not quite as big as the Giant. He is known in America as the Standard Schnauzer.

The home country for the Schnauzer is Germany, where he filled many roles: a ratter, a drovers’ dog, a stock tender and a guard in the house and stables. He was even used to pull carts to market, making him the all-round farm dog. The first standard for the medium-size Schnauzer was produced in 1880.

This good-looking, robust dog is well muscled and has a harsh, wiry coat in either black or pepper and salt (shades of grey), which needs a lot of attention to keep him looking smart and tailored. As with the other two sizes, the Schnauzers’ coat needs regular grooming and maintenance, about every 8 – 10 weeks. He does shed his coat and therefore needs regular brushing and combing to help to prevent the legs and the beard from tangling.

He has a lively nature, is a good housedog and guard and enjoys obedience work. Gentle, patient and trustworthy with children, he is the ideal companion for an active person who is able to give him plenty of exercise at least an hour day.

COMPANIONS

The Schnauzer makes an ideal family pet and will fit in with all age groups. They are excellent housedogs. If someone is around they will soon bark and let you know. Please remember that small children should be taught that dogs are a family pet and not a toy to be continually picked up. He is equally at home in either a town or in the country, in a small or medium house or bungalow with a medium to large sized, totally fenced-in garden. The lifespan of a Schnauzer is over 10 years of age.

EXERCISE

The Schnauzer will accommodate to your lifestyle and in general requires up to one hour of exercise per day but is always willing to go for any extra on offer.

FOOD

Schnauzers usually have good appetites so you may have to watch their diet. Seldom will they refuse food especially the wrong sort. Be careful with tit-bits or you will become the owner of a very overweight dog.

Please remember a dog is for life and the Schnauzer is a lovely breed.

The Giant Schnauzer

ARE YOU THE RIGHT PERSON FOR A GIANT SCHNAUZER?giant

As a result of his size and working ability, the Giant is considered to be a good, sound-working breed. He is an imposing dog, large, well built and square in outline, he combines strength with agility. His outlook is bold and vigorous.

In Germany, especially around the Munich area, farmers used him as a droving dog from the fifteenth century until the coming of the railways, when large cattle drives vanished. Interest in the breed was lost in the rural communities and he re-emerged in the towns and cities as a guard or even a mascot in beer halls and butchers’ shops. He also became a breed used widely for police and security work in Europe.

Today, the Giant Schnauzer is an intelligent, versatile, bold, composed, reliable, good-natured dog, very amenable to training and not aggressive unless provoked. He is a very good housedog and an extremely lovable pet.

The breed comes in two colours, black or pepper and salt. His coat is dense, harsh, wiry and weather resistant and therefore should be trimmed regularly. His distinctive prominent eyebrows, bristly moustache and whiskers give his strong head a keen expression. Once seen, he is never forgotten. He is slow to mature, but a good stayer.

The Giant Schnauzers’ coat needs regular grooming and maintenance, about every 8 – 10 weeks, because he does not cast or shed his coat. Regular weekly brushes and combs help to prevent the legs and the beard from tangling.

The male Giant Schnauzer can be expected to grow from 65-70cms (25.5 – 27.5ins) the females are between 60-65cms (23.5 – 25.5ins) but, some have been know to grow taller as well as smaller than the sizes above. The average weight for the Giant male can be 47kg. This provided that he has the correct rearing and upbringing.

He must be built like an athlete, muscular, fit and very agile. He is also highly intelligent excelling in many forms of discipline. He will love to learn, and so they are good at such activities as obedience and agility. Their natural ability to guard and protect their home and people, makes the Giant Schnauzer a valuable asset to its family, as long as it is part of the family, and not left outside on its own.

Remember, the Giant Schnauzer likes to be one of the family and therefore wants to be involved with whatever its family is doing, even if its just sitting watching the TV. Like any breed, if he is left alone with no human input, the Giant Schnauzer becomes board, unresponsive and loses respect for its owners; eventually they become unruly and uncontrollable. After 12 months of training and hard work, you now have an adolescent teenager. This is where a Giant Schnauzer can try your patience because he does have a stubborn streak, but this is linked to their intelligence. Therefore, if you decide you would like to own a Giant Schnauzer you must be prepared to give lots of quality time to your dog from a puppy all the way through to its adult life. Rest assured the response and love you will receive are greater than any human could give.

HEREDITARY PROBLEMS

Multifocal Retinal Dysplasia (MRD) and Hereditary Cataracts (HC) occur in the Giant Schnauzer. Every care should be taken to eradicate such problems from the breed. All Giant Schnauzers must be eye tested before mating. You should also check before purchasing a puppy that he has a clear eye test certificate. For more information please see Health Testing – Giant Schnauzer

COMPANIONS

The Giant Schnauzer makes an ideal family pet and will fit in with all age groups. They are excellent housedogs. If someone is around they will soon bark and let you know. Please remember that small children should be taught that dogs are a family pet and not a toy to be continually picked up. He is equally at home in either a town or in the country, in a large house or bungalow with a medium to large sized, totally fenced-in garden. The lifespan of a Giant Schnauzer is over 10 years of age.

EXERCISE

The Giant Schnauzer will accommodate to your lifestyle and in general requires up to two hours of exercise per day but is always willing to go for any extra on offer.

FOOD

Giant Schnauzers usually have good appetites so you may have to watch their diet. Seldom will they refuse food especially the wrong sort. Be careful with tit-bits or you will become the owner of a very overweight dog.

Please remember a dog is for life and the Giant Schnauzer is a lovely breed.

 

For any further information or advice please contact the Acting Secretary Christine Ellingworth